Meet writer Shelley Moench-Kelly

Updated: Jan 3


Writer Name: Shelley Moench-Kelly

Location: Manhattan adjacent

Years of Experience: 21

Available for writing projects: Yes!

Niche/Beat/Genre: Ghostwriting, food/hospitality, beauty, finance, entertainment, lifestyle, travel

Portfolio website(s): smkwriter.com

Other websites/blogs: heresyourpillkitten.com

Books: Here’s Your Pill, Kitten!, Detached: A Memoir (ghostwritten); both available on Amazon

Favorite food: Katsudon: A Japanese dish consisting of a breaded and fried pork cutlet with an omelet served over rice with sautéed onions.

Writing tip for fellow writers: Take on every gig you have interest in and sometimes, gigs you don’t. Eventually you’ll snag bigger gigs without having starved by just waiting for them.



Shelley Moench-Kelly is a New York and New England-based writer, ghostwriter and editor from Tokyo, via Los Angeles.


Her areas of experience are varied and include memoir/fiction/nonfiction books, finance blogs, lifestyle blogs, parenting articles, feature articles for the beauty/medical trades, entertainment industry projects and travel/hospitality guides, just to name a few.


Shelley started out at the McGraw-Hill companies in Los Angeles, then moved into writing and editing for beauty business trade magazines for 10 years. She’s been a ghostwriter and full-time freelance writer for six years, with freelance clients including Google, L’Oreal Paris, The Prop Store, Paramount Pictures, Mamapedia, The Week, and Warner Brothers.


For food inspiration, Shelley says that she turns to the simple recipes and creations that her Asian grandmother taught her. “My grandmother created a relish of diced tomatoes, sweet onions, salt, pepper, and a splash of white vinegar, which she’d serve with steamed rice and fried trout,” Shelley says. “She also crafted a dipping sauce of ketchup, soy sauce, and a splash of Tabasco that I still make to this day!”


During a sweet-tooth-inspired craving, and no flour in the house to make cake, Shelley says that her grandmother caramelized some butter and brown sugar in a skillet and dumped a po